Our international work

People who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender are present in all countries. Countries with significant numbers of LGBT members represented in active groups include the USA, Canada and Uganda (Integrity groups), Australia, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and New Zealand (Changing Attitude groups) and South Africa. Elsewhere in the Anglican Communion, LGBT church members are less easy to identify.

Where prejudice, homophobia and denial of sexual difference define the culture, as in Africa, secrecy becomes imperative. Many would not identify themselves as gay, though knowing they are physically and emotionally attracted to the same sex, but as men who have sex with men (MSM). Changing Attitude research shows that tens of thousands of Africans in their teens, twenties and thirties now identify as lesbian or gay.

Lambeth Conference

The bishops of the Anglican Communion meet every 10 years in Canterbury. Changing Attitude and Integrity USA were present at Lambeth 1998 when the notorious Resolution 1.10 was passed. In 2008 we were part of the St Anne’s Network. We had a stall in the Market Place and organized fringe meetings.

Primates Meetings

The thirty-eight Primates of the Anglican Communion meet every two years. Changing Attitude has been present and reported from the meetings in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, in 2007 and Alexandria, Egypt in 2009. We plan to report from the next meeting in Dublin in February 2011.

Anglican Consultative Council

The ACC meets every three years approximately. Changing Attitude attended the meeting in Nottingham in 2005 and in Kingston Jamaica in May 2009, attending the sessions, services and press conferences and reporting online.

Integrity

Integrity is the leading public voice for the full inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in the Episcopal Church. Founded in 1974 by Dr. Louie Crew, Integrity has grown to become an organization with members across the country – LGBT and straight, rural and urban, in congregations large and small. Integrity has 57 chapters and over 2,000 individual members.

Integrity fulfills a key uniting role, and seeks to bring together individuals and congregations who share the vision of a church in which all the baptized are fully included in the Body of Christ. Over the years, Integrity’s ministry has expanded beyond the Episcopal Church. It has become a respected voice for equal rights in the wider society on issues such as marriage equality and human rights.

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